How are the American ideals of freedom, equality, liberty and progress in tension (or not in tension) with Native American policy in the late 18th century and early 19th century?

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2 Responses to How are the American ideals of freedom, equality, liberty and progress in tension (or not in tension) with Native American policy in the late 18th century and early 19th century?

  1. Aaron R says:

    American ideals of freedom, equality, liberty, and progress are all being pushed in this case. the american’s believe that everyone desrves freedom and has rights. in this case they didnt allow the indians to have andy rights. they also made the indians lesser than themselves and took control of everything even though it was not theirs. they gave them no liberty in court and ignored their rebllion against their indian removal act. but progress is still agreeable. they made progress west and expanded the american nation to make is a stronger nation. i do not think this was a very american thing to do to the native american. they put these ideals to the side and did what they felt was right even though it did not follow what they stood for.

  2. Jeremy Cottle says:

    I completely agree with Aaron. The American ideals of freedom, equality, and liberty are not upheld whatsoever in the Indian Removal Act. The Native Americans were thought of as being inferior to the white Americans. President Andrew Jackson himself stated that the Native Americans had “savage habits” and were not a developed, civilized race (“Andrew Jackson’s Second Annual Message to Congress”). The thoughts of the president during that time show the general ideas related to the Native Americans and their potential to be a smart, developed civilization. Overall, the Indians were thought of as inferior to the white Americans that would kick them out of their land and take it for themselves. Freedom and liberty did not seemed to be considered at all in the Indian Removal Act. The Native Americans had no freedom or liberty whatsoever. They had no control over their land being taken. Tribes even came to the government, pleading for their land, but their petitions were ignored. They were forced against their will to move to another land where the resources were less bountiful and the conditions were worse. Overall, they had little to no freedom or liberty.
    However, progress was certainly considered with Native American policy in the late 18th and 19th century. The whole point of the Indian Removal Act was to have the United States spread west to progress as a nation. This westward move would have helped the country’s economy and overall power. Therefore, progress was probably one of the most important ideals that were taken into consideration when it came to Native American policy.

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